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Few rock bands are anywhere near as iconic as Fleetwood Mac, but according to a recent interview with Stevie Nicks in The Guardian, the band would likely have had to cut their rise to fame short if she hadn’t ended a pregnancy in 1979.
“If I had not had that abortion, I’m pretty sure there would have been no Fleetwood Mac,” Nicks, now 72, told the paper.
At the time of her abortion, Nicks was dating The Eagles singer Don Henley. Fleetwood Mac had already released Rumours, and the band was at its height. It simply wasn’t a good time for Nicks to have a child, she said. “There’s just no way that I could have had a child then, working as hard as we worked constantly. And there were a lot of drugs, I was doing a lot of drugs … I would have had to walk away.”
Reproductive rights have been top of mind for Nicks since the September 18 death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who Nicks called her “hero,” The Guardian reported. Nicks’s mother, too, had a big impact on how the singer saw herself in a man’s world. “She said to me: You will never stand in a room full of men and feel like you can’t keep up with them. And you will never depend upon a man to support you. She drummed that into me, and I’m so glad she did.”
Nicks explained that her choice to have an abortion was largely informed by the purpose she felt Fleetwood Mac was fulfilling and what it represented for women artists. “I knew that the music we were going to bring to the world was going to heal so many people’s hearts and make people so happy. And I thought: you know what? That’s really important,” she said. “Two lead women singers, two lead women writers. That was my world’s mission.”

Stevie Nicks: Without My Abortion, Fleetwood Mac Probably Wouldn’t Exist | SELF
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Note the comment comes from the website entitled, “Self”

But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, (2 Timothy 3:1-2)

In the name of healing and selfish ambition a child should be murdered.

Truly such is the logic of demons and evil spirits.

[colorbox font_size=”18px” font_style=”IBM Plex Sans” border_style=”groove” border_color=”#b53f3f” border_width=”4px”]They sacrificed their sons and their daughters to demons. (Psalm 106:37)[/colorbox]

 


I find it hard to just ignore, the murdered unborn children,
Yes times have changed, but still God warns, you shall not take a life.
I want to save a life today, I want to keep one alive for my Father,
Who will avenge the blood!
Of weak and helpless ones someday, whose lives are spilled out like water,
Lambs in the slaughter, and each one is handmade by Jesus.

I find it hard to turn away, a billion starving people, a billion starving people
by Kieth Green, A Billion Starving People


| Background Information |
| other source commentary |

Not a problem, Satan, the Devil is more than pleased to tell you “sweet little lies” like killing your baby will help the world.
[colorbox font_size=”18px” font_style=”IBM Plex Sans” border_style=”groove” border_color=”#b53f3f” border_width=”4px”]And no wonder, for Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light. (2 Corinthians 11:14)[/colorbox]
 

 
Fleetwood Mac are a British-American rock band, formed in London in 1967. Fleetwood Mac were founded by guitarist Peter Green, drummer Mick Fleetwood and guitarist Jeremy Spencer, before bassist John McVie joined the lineup for their self-titled debut album. Danny Kirwan joined as a third guitarist in 1968. Keyboardist Christine Perfect, who contributed as a session musician from the second album, married McVie and joined in 1970.
Primarily a British blues band, Fleetwood Mac scored a UK number one with “Albatross“,[6] and had other hits such as the singles “Oh Well” and “Man of the World“. All three guitarists left in succession during the early 1970s, to be replaced by guitarists Bob Welch and Bob Weston and vocalist Dave Walker. By 1974, all three of them had either departed or been dismissed, leaving the band without a male lead vocalist or guitarist. In late 1974, while Fleetwood was scouting studios in Los Angeles, he was introduced to American folk-rock duo Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Fleetwood Mac soon asked Buckingham to be their new lead guitarist, and Buckingham agreed on condition that Nicks would also join the band.
The addition of Buckingham and Nicks gave the band a more pop rock sound, and their 1975 self-titled album, Fleetwood Mac, reached No. 1 in the United States. Rumours (1977), Fleetwood Mac’s second album after the arrival of Buckingham and Nicks, produced four U.S. Top 10 singles and remained at number one on the American albums chart for 31 weeks. It also reached the top spot in various countries around the world and won a Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 1978. Rumours has sold over 40 million copies worldwide, making it the one of the best-selling albums in history. The band went through personal turmoil while recording the album, as both the romantic partnerships in the band (one being John and Christine McVie, and the other being Buckingham and Nicks) separated while continuing to make music together.
The band’s personnel remained stable through three more studio albums, but by the late 1980s began to disintegrate. After Buckingham and Nicks each left the band, they were replaced by a number of other guitarists and vocalists. A 1993 one-off performance for the first inauguration of Bill Clinton featured the lineup of Fleetwood, John McVie, Christine McVie, Nicks, and Buckingham back together for the first time in six years. A full reunion occurred four years later, and the group released their fourth U.S. No. 1 album, The Dance (1997), a live compilation of their hits, also marking the 20th anniversary of Rumours. Christine McVie left the band in 1998, but continued to work with the band in a session capacity. Meanwhile, the group remained together as a four-piece, releasing their most recent studio album, Say You Will, in 2003. Christine McVie rejoined the band full-time in 2014. In 2018, Buckingham was fired from the band[7] and was replaced by Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Neil Finn of Split Enz and Crowded House.
Fleetwood Mac have sold more than 120 million records worldwide, making them one of the world’s best-selling bands. In 1979, the group were honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1998 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame[8] and received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music.[9]


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[private role=”administrator”]Few rock bands are anywhere near as iconic as Fleetwood Mac, but according to a recent interview with Stevie Nicks in The Guardian, the band would likely have had to cut their rise to fame short if she hadn’t ended a pregnancy in 1979. “If I had not had that abortion, I’m pretty sure there would have been no Fleetwood Mac,” Nicks, now 72, told the paper. At the time of her abortion, Nicks was dating The Eagles singer Don Henley. Fleetwood Mac had already released Rumours, and the band was at its height. It simply wasn’t a good time for Nicks to have a child, she said. “There’s just no way that I could have had a child then, working as hard as we worked constantly. And there were a lot of drugs, I was doing a lot of drugs … I would have had to walk away.” Reproductive rights have been top of mind for Nicks since the September 18 death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who Nicks called her “hero,” The Guardian reported. Nicks’s mother, too, had a big impact on how the singer saw herself in a man’s world. “She said to me: You will never stand in a room full of men and feel like you can’t keep up with them. And you will never depend upon a man to support you. She drummed that into me, and I’m so glad she did.” Nicks explained that her choice to have an abortion was largely informed by the purpose she felt Fleetwood Mac was fulfilling and what it represented for women artists. “I knew that the music we were going to bring to the world was going to heal so many people’s hearts and make people so happy. And I thought: you know what? That’s really important,” she said. “Two lead women singers, two lead women writers. That was my world’s mission.” The singer fears that abortion will be outlawed if conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed as a new Supreme Court justice now that President Trump nominated her for the role, and if former Vice President Joe Biden doesn’t win the upcoming election. Abortion rights activists are dreading what Barrett’s confirmation could mean for Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision ruling that the constitutional right to privacy extended to abortion, thus legalizing abortion in the United States. It’s clear that Barrett has a history of personally opposing abortion. What’s less clear is whether a Supreme Court containing Barrett would actually overturn Roe v. Wade or potentially chip away at abortion access in other decisions. According to CNN, in 2017, Barrett said: “Roe has been affirmed many times and survived many challenges in the court, and it’s more than 40 years old, and it’s clearly binding on all Court of Appeals. And so it is not open to me or up to me, and I would have no interest in, as a Court of Appeals judge, challenging that precedent—it would bind.” As for President Trump, he has made it clear that he wants to overturn federal protections for abortion. He has promised to keep “filling the Supreme Court and lower courts” with judges who are against abortion. He has also blocked federal funding from going to U.S. organizations that offer abortions, along with supporting numerous other restrictions on abortion that you can read more about here. Related: The Nightmarish Challenge of Trying to Get an Abortion in a Pandemic 4 People Fighting to Save Abortion Access in Texas Explain What’s at Stake Young People Seeking Abortions Don’t Need Parental Approval—They Need Health Care Colleen Stinchcombe grew up in the deserts of California and Arizona before transplanting herself to the Pacific Northwest. She has more than five years of experience writing and editing for digital media and has a B.A. in English-Creative Writing (Fiction) from Arizona State University. Her work has been published at… Read more SELF does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Any information published on this website or by this brand is not intended as a substitute for medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.[/private]